Leonard Cohen’s ‘Joan of Arc’ – Joan’s Reply to Fire

‘Well then fire, make your body cold

I’m going to give you mine to hold,

Saying this she climbed inside

To be his one, to be his only bride.’

Leonard Cohen utilises imprecise and abstract statements rather than particular and specific ones. This is true of the character of Fire in ‘Joan of Arc, because it or he could be said to represent many ideas –

– Death/Mortality

– All consuming sexual or spiritual love

– The ghost of Nico’s rapist who was sentenced to death

– Cohen himself, and his attraction to Nico

– Temptation

– Pain and suffering

– Fear

– Something else

Whatever the Fire is, Joan of Arc talks directly to it and tells it what to do! I think this is about preparing the mind for any struggle. We have to get into the mindset where what we hope to achieve seems really possible. As she was heading for the flames, Joan of Arc acts as if she still has control, and it is this which makes her so eternally brave.

Rather than be dragged towards the flames, Joan of Arc decides to give herself to them. It is about staying brave even when things seem as bad as they can be. If she has to enter the flames, then she will stay in control, by acting as though it was always her decision to do so. This stops the experience being so humiliating and therefore reduces her pain.

Fire concludes with ‘Myself I long for love and light, but must it come so cruel and oh so bright?’

There is a healing quality in this. Fire is a powerful element, but even he is in awe of the uncompromising and determined woman he has wedded. In the song Cohen is careful not to say that Fire actually kills her. He adapts it to ‘He took the dust of Joan of Arc.’ 

Dust shining in light, is one of the smallest things we can see – without the help of a microscope. So by saying that Fire took the dust of her, it draws attention to the physical but reduces its significance. Only her dust was taken.

Through the song we learn about her heroic nature, and it doesn’t seem that Fire’s action is able to alter her nature at all. The story is very dramatic, and Cohen tells us that it is Fire who was altered because of the meeting! He had longed for her, but he didn’t get what he was expecting – the experience was ‘cruel’ and ‘bright’. He reflects on this, and wonders if there could have been another way. Joan of Arc is immortalised into legend as a woman who stood up for what she believed in and never relented. Fire continues to be an element that relies on fuel to survive. Joan of Arc’s heart was a self sufficient fire all of it’s own, and the physical flames of human suffering were powerless to reduce her mythical spirit.

the-beautiful-nico-from-velvet-underground

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One thought on “Leonard Cohen’s ‘Joan of Arc’ – Joan’s Reply to Fire

  1. Pingback: Leonard Cohen’s ‘Joan of Arc’ – Joan’s Reply to Fire | myotherblogisanewspaper

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